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Keep your Thanksgiving additive-free by making green bean casserole from real food ingredients. It's tastier too... :)

 

So, what are the essential parts of any green bean casserole?

The green beans, the cream of mushroom soup, and the french-fried onions, right?

This beloved casserole has earned a place of honor on our Thanksgiving table each year, but up until a few years ago, it consisted of opening cans of green beans, opening cans of soup, and yup – opening a can of french-fried onions to whip up and bake to perfection.

But as my family has been on our whole foods journey in the last few years, Green Bean Casserole put me in a conundrum – what to do with our beloved favorite?

Well, as long-time readers of this site know, I have a love of reverse engineering, so as I was writing my cookbook – The DIY Pantry – I made sure there were solidly good recipes for all of the above-mentioned convenience foods so that my family and yours could once again indulge in this classic holiday side dish.

So let's take a quick look at each of the ingredients so you can pull this together in a jiffy:

The Green Beans

Beans are pretty straightforward – simply use your favorites! Whether you have fresh beans available, frozen beans, or choose to use canned, french-style beans, use whatever green beans you love.

The only caveats I have are that fresh and frozen beans will need to be boiled or steamed first so that they don't release their water into the casserole (rendering it more watery than you may desire) and if you use canned beans, try – if possible – to use a brand that uses a BPA-free lining or packs their beans in glass.

The Cream of Mushroom Soup

The cream of mushroom soup is, admittedly, the reason we make a homemade version of green bean casserole, as most store-bought cream of mushroom soups contain a long list of additives and preservatives that make it anything but nourishing.

And thankfully, a thick, condensed, homemade cream of mushroom soup isn't difficult to make, although you have to decide whether you want a quick version or a more-like-store-bought version, which uses evaporated milk.

Now, if you're a purist, you'll want to make the evaporated milk, but a word to the wise – homemade evaporated milk takes a while to make. (You can see the recipe and all the details here.) If you want a much quicker version (like I do 90% of the time I make this), feel free to use canned evaporated milk or simply substitute in one part cream to three parts milk when making the cream of mushroom soup. It won't have quite the same texture, but is still gorgeously yummy, so I find it a worthwhile substitution to save the time.

And if you're looking to purchase a canned evaporated milk, preferably find a brand that doesn't contain carrageenan, such as this one, if you can. (Although, that one is fat-free, so choose your lesser of two evils.)

So, to sum up, the cream of mushroom soup itself is quick to make, but decide ahead whether you're going to make homemade evaporated milk, purchase evaporated milk, or use a cream-and-milk substitute.

See the recipe right here: Homemade Condensed Cream of Mushroom Soup

For a lovely store-bought option: Organic Cream of Mushroom Soup

The French Fried Onions

The crowning glory of green bean casserole is the fried onions. When I originally wrote this back in 2013, store-bought french-fried onions without hydrogenated oils and preservatives were few and far between. Now, they're much easier to find, so they're a decidedly decent option.

However, making homemade ones isn't difficult – they just take a bit of time. They're also delectable for snacking and super-inexpensive, so if you've got the time, I recommend making a double batch. πŸ™‚

See the recipe here: Homemade French Fried Onions

For a scrumptious store-bought version, try these French Fried Crispy Onions

Happy cooking!

Print

Real Food Green Bean Casserole

Keep your Thanksgiving additive-free by making green bean casserole from real food ingredients. It's tastier too... :)

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds green beans, snapped into 2-inch pieces (frozen beans are fine, if desired)
  • a dash of traditionally-fermented soy sauce (see where to buy soy sauce)
  • a dash of Worcestershire sauce (see how to make a homemade version in The DIY Pantry
  • 1/8 teaspoon black pepper
  • 2 cups condensed cream of mushroom soup (see recipe here)
  • 2 cups French fried onions (see recipe here)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350Β°F.
  2. Bring a large pot of water to a boil, then add the beans. Cook until tender but still bright green, 6-8 minutes. Drain well.
  3. Place the beans in a large bowl and add the soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, pepper, and the cream of mushroom soup. Mix well.
  4. Place in a square casserole dish and bake until bubbly, 15-25 minutes (depending on whether your soup base was hot or cold). Add the French fried onions on top and bake for another 5-10 minutes until the onions are crispy and golden.
  5. Serve hot.

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 6

 

 

 

 

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9 thoughts on “Real Food Green Bean Casserole

  1. Carol G. says:

    I love the convenience of the easy to use Yum print account on your blog. I had never used it before now and like it a lot.

    • Kresha Faber says:

      Yes, you can use whatever milk substitute you would like, the higher the fat content the better (low-fat milks such as rice milk don’t tend to cream well in the soup). Soy would perform quite well, I would imagine, but I would strongly recommend against using it, which is due merely to the dangers of soy rather than how it would function in the recipe. Here’s one good article on soy: http://www.foodrenegade.com/dangers-of-soy/

      Enjoy! I hope you have a great Thanksgiving. πŸ™‚

  2. Eran Ratnayaka says:

    Sorry could not find the link to download the free cook book. I would greatly appreciate if you could send/ direct me to it.

    Thanks
    Eran

    • Kresha Faber says:

      The link should be in your confirmation e-mail once you have signed up for our newsletter updates.

      If you don’t see it there, contact us via the Contact Us link in the “About” tab at the top of every page and we’ll make sure you get a copy! πŸ™‚

      Have a great day.

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