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Chai Kombucha

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Well, I finally did it! I finally figured out how to make a flavor of kombucha I really really like.

I often use kombucha in condiments, in salads, and in other beverages to add a probiotic kick, but I’ve never been crazy about drinking it plain. At various times, I’ve played around with flavors and come up with a few that I’ve nominally liked, but this one… ho ho! It’s good!

What’s extra-fun is that my two-year-old would rather drink this kombucha than apple juice. Score!

For those who are new to kombucha, making a flavored kombucha is a two-step process. First you brew your kombucha using a sugary tea solution and a SCOBY (symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast) which takes 1-4 weeks, then you pour your kombucha into bottles, add flavorings, and let it sit for an additional 24-48 hours. Even though the brewing process can sometimes look like a mad scientist’s research gone wrong, the results are absolutely worth it.

In the case of chai kombucha, there are some recipes that recommend making the tea by using chai teabags in your original brew, which would brew it and flavor it at the same time. However, I would strongly caution against this, thanks to the expert advice found at Cultures for Health and Get Kombucha!, as the added essential oils found in the chai teabags can affect the health of your scoby and interfere with the brewing process, causing an unsafe final product. I always like to use pH test strips to make sure my batches are safe – if your kombucha is less than 4.0, you know you’re good to go.

Also, kombucha is packed with a probiotic punch – so much so that it needs to be treated a bit like a medicine. If you’ve never drunk kombucha before, don’t drink more than one cup each day of this yummy blend for the first few days. It’s a fantastic detoxifier and weight loss aid and it can cause colonic distress if introduced too quickly.

Click here to see how to get more fermented foods in your diet.

Chai Kombucha

Chai Kombucha

Per quart of kombucha:
1 quart plain kombucha
10 whole cardamom pods
1 cinnamon stick
1-inch fresh ginger, cut into matchsticks

 

Brew your kombucha for 7-31 days.

To flavor, pour your finished kombucha into mason jars with tight fitting lids or Grolsch-style flip top bottles (old Grolsch bottles work like a charm), reserving enough plain kombucha to start another batch. Add the cardamom pods, cinnamon stick, and fresh ginger, then let sit at room temperature for 24-48 hours before moving to the refrigerator.

If you’re going to be making several bottles or you would like an extra bubbly drink, change the order a bit: first pour your finished kombucha into one large container with a tight fitting lid and add your spices. Let sit for 24-48 hours, then pour into small flip-top or other tight-lidded serving containers. Let sit for an additional 24-48 hours at room temperature to become carbonated, then move to the refrigerator.

 

This post has been included at GAPS Friendly Fridays and at Fat Tuesday.

 

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Comments

    • NourishingJoy says

      I’ve never tried, so I can’t give a review on how strongly they would flavor a second batch, but I myself would tend to shy away from reusing the spices. When I pull the spices out of my batches, they tend to be pretty “used up,” especially the cardamom, and slightly slimy from the yeast die-off in the kombucha.

      However, since the spices are only in the kombucha for a day or two, you could certainly try and see if you like it! There is the slight chance of cross-contamination if certain bacteria got into one batch which would then be transferred to a subsequent batch, but I would think the chances of that would be relatively low since the kombucha would have already brewed successfully in the first fermentation stage.

      Good luck! Please let us know if you do try the spices in a second batch – I’m curious what your results would be. :-)

  1. Kurt says

    Hmmm, now I’m feeling a little nervous. A friend gave me a kombucha scoby in a bag filled with chai kombucha. I have no idea if she made it using chai tea bags, but I suspect she did. I also saw she was brewing a flavored white tea kombucha in another jar on her counter. I’m now skeptical about how safe her scoby might be, since it sounds like the oils and spices could be interfering with the scoby. I see at Cultures for Health they just recommend using only black or green tea to brew kombucha, and say using other varieties could interfere with the pH of the product as it brews. What do you think I should do? Should I just toss this scoby and order another one to get a proper start?

    • Kresha says

      No, don’t feel nervous. The “interfering with the health of the scoby” is a long-term thing, not something that will necessarily take effect over one brewing period.

      As for pH, if it affects the pH of any one specific brew, you’ll be able to tell, either by the visible growth of molds (orange, black, yellow, or green), or by the smell.

      So, thank your friend for the scoby, choose whatever tea you would like to use for brewing, and brew with confidence! And enjoy! :-)

      Oh, and if you’re really wanting “proof” that the brew is safe, get some pH test strips from a winemaking store, a compounding pharmacy, or from Cultures for Health. A finished, safe kombucha will read under 4.0.

    • Kresha says

      Yes, absolutely! I would use however many typically fit inside a pod and multiply it by 10. I haven’t cracked open a cardamom pod for a long time, so I don’t rightly remember how many there are….

      Hope that helps!

  2. Allie says

    What kind of tea do you use to make your plain kombucha that you use for the chai kombucha? I need a mild flavored decaf tea to use for kombucha.
    Tanks,
    Allie

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