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Old Fashioned Eggnog

Old-Fashioned Homemade Eggnog | NourishingJoy.com

My new book, The DIY Pantry, is due on bookshelves in just a few days, so this week I’m publishing a few recipes from the book here on the blog, merely because I can’t contain my excitement! Today it’s Old-Fashioned Eggnog’s turn in the spotlight.

Eggnog is undeniably one of my favorite beverages during the Christmas season, especially at New Year’s. Eggnog is one of winter’s delights and since the Middle Ages has served as a toast to prosperity and good health.

I eagerly and lovingly whisk a double batch in a big bowl each year, just because it’s like drinking ice cream that’s silky and sensuous and everyone always wants seconds.

And I must admit that I can’t bring myself to buy it anymore. Even though we could easily drink eggnog every day during the holiday season, ever since I discovered the long list of undesirable ingredients in most store-bought brands (and since I took my first creamy sip of classic, old-fashioned eggnog), I simply make a point to make this homemade version once or twice every year and we savor it heartily.

Plus, it helps us all eat more raw egg yolks – and that’s always a good thing. (If you can’t eat raw egg yolks, fear not – there are directions for a cooked homemade eggnog below too.)

 

A Word About Raw Egg Yolks

And I *must* do my due diligence and remind everyone that whenever you’re eating raw egg yolks, it is imperative that they are as absolutely as fresh as possible and that they are from pastured hens.

This isn’t just a nutritional thing, as we discuss regularly here, but this is for your safety. While raw egg yolks contain a gorgeous amount of potent vitamins and minerals, conventional eggs typically sit for several weeks before they find their way into your shopping basket, so while they might be fine for your breakfast scramble, more often than not, they won’t be fine for raw consumption.

“So how do I find fresh eggs?” you ask.

Well, start by searching on Craigslist for people who have chickens in their backyards or small farms in your area that sell direct to consumer.

Next, check at your local farmers’ market. If you don’t know where there is one in your area, find one via Local Harvest, Eat Wild, or Sustainable Table.

You can also check at your local health food store for local farm fresh eggs. If need be, call the farm and ask what their typical timeline is for getting eggs to the store and ask the store how long eggs typically sit in the back.

But after all that, just sit back and enjoy this scrumptious, delicious, absolutely delightful, old-fashioned eggnog.

 

How to Make a Cooked Egg Base for Homemade Eggnog

But what if you simply CAN’T eat raw eggs due to health reasons, you can’t find fresh eggs, or the thought of it just freaks you out?

Yes, you can still enjoy this scrumptious treat!

I originally included this little addendum in a comment below, but realized it would be helpful to have here in the post as well, so here is how to make a cooked egg base for homemade eggnog:

Whisk together the egg yolks and the milk (but not the cream) in a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan. Clip a candy thermometer on the side of the pan if you have one.

Cook the mixture very gently over medium-low heat until it reaches a temperature of 160°F, stirring constantly so the eggs don’t curdle AND so the mixture doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan. This is very important (and requires both patience and a strong arm – I recommend listening to an audiobook or your favorite Christmas music to the pass the time enjoyably).

If you don’t have a thermometer, you’ll be able to tell the mixture has come to temperature when the mixture thickly coats the back of metal spoon and retains its shape when you drag your finger through the mixture on the spoon without filling in the gap.

After cooking, chill the mixture completely, then add the remaining ingredients at least two hours before serving to allow flavors to mingle.

 

Here’s to a healthy, blessed new year!

Old-Fashioned Eggnog
From The DIY Pantry
makes 5 cups
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Ingredients
  1. 1 1/2 cups milk, preferably raw (see why raw milk is preferable)
  2. 2 cups cream, preferably raw
  3. 9 egg yolks, as fresh as possible
  4. 1/4 cup maple syrup (more to taste)
  5. 1 teaspoon real vanilla extract
  6. 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon
  7. lots and lots of fresh ground nutmeg (I usually grate in at least 1/2 teaspoon)
Instructions
  1. 1. Place all ingredients in a blender or a large bowl. Blend or whisk until very smooth and a bit frothy.
  2. 2. Set in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour and preferably overnight to chill thoroughly and allow flavors to blend.
  3. 3. Serve chilled. Store in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.
How to Make a Cooked Egg Base for Homemade Eggnog
  1. Whisk together the egg yolks and the milk (but not the cream) in a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan. Clip a candy thermometer on the side of the pan if you have one.
  2. Cook the mixture very gently over medium-low heat until it reaches a temperature of 160°F, stirring constantly so the eggs don’t curdle AND so the mixture doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan. This is very important (and requires both patience and a strong arm).
  3. If you don’t have a thermometer, you’ll be able to tell the mixture has come to temperature when the mixture thickly coats the back of metal spoon and retains its shape when you drag your finger through the mixture on the spoon without filling in the gap.
  4. After cooking, chill the mixture completely, then add the remaining ingredients at least two hours before serving to allow flavors to mingle.
Nourishing Joy http://nourishingjoy.com/

 

  Old-Fashioned Homemade Eggnog | NourishingJoy.com

 

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This post may contain affiliate links, including those from Amazon.com, which means we earn a small commission off your purchases. And here's the thing: We only mention services and products that we think are truly worth your attention, whether they're free, paid, or otherwise. This site relies on YOUR trust, so if we don't stand behind a product 110%, it's not mentioned. Period.

Comments

  1. kelly blackie says

    What do you mean by “pasteurized” hens? I have my own hens, but we have never eaten their eggs raw before….How do I pasteurize my hens?

    • Kresha Faber says

      Kelly,

      Nope, you don’t have to do anything to your hens. 🙂 This calls for eggs from PASTURED hens, not pasteurized. All this means is that the eggs are from hens who run around outside eating grass and bugs rather than being stuck in cages or in closed barns. So, I would assume from your comment that yours are already pastured. 😉

    • Kresha Faber says

      Oh, goodness – anything you want! Use them as a meringue in a pie, make marshmallows, make a cheese and egg white omelette, use them as glue on a child’s creation, use an an egg wash on homemade bread or other baked goods… they’re versatile! 🙂

  2. Mary says

    I LOVE eggnog and I also love to make things myself so I know exactly what is going into them. Today was my first time making homemade eggnog and it was delicious. I did use fresh eggs, milk, and cream from locals here in Wyoming. YUMMY!!! Thanks for sharing the recipe.

  3. Ferstikle says

    Hi, I live overseas and don’t really trust the eggs here enough to eat them raw. Would this recipe still work if I heat it up?

    • Kresha Faber says

      Yes, you absolutely may! And it’s as simple as making a cooked egg base, similar to how you would make a custard or ice cream.

      Here’s how to make a cooked egg base for homemade eggnog:

      Whisk together the egg yolks and the milk (but not the cream) in a large, heavy-bottomed saucepan. Clip a candy thermometer on the side of the pan if you have one.

      Cook the mixture very gently over medium-low heat until it reaches a temperature of 160°F, stirring constantly so the eggs don’t curdle AND so the mixture doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan. This is very important (and requires both patience and a strong arm).

      If you don’t have a thermometer, you’ll be able to tell the mixture has come to temperature when the mixture thickly coats the back of metal spoon and retains its shape when you drag your finger through the mixture without filling in the gap.

      After cooking, chill the mixture completely, then add the remaining ingredients at least two hours before serving to allow flavors to mingle.

      I hope that helps. Enjoy!

  4. Sommer says

    How long would you leave this in the refrigerator if you used to modified “cooked egg” recipe? I would love to make this for my husband, but he is the only one that drinks it in our house.

    • Kresha Faber says

      I would leave it in the refrigerator the same as any other cooked custard or pudding, usually 2-3 days.

      I hope that helps! 🙂

  5. Lana says

    Hi. I’m really excited about this recipe! Just one question, what type of cream should I use, 1/2 and 1/2 or whipping cream? I don’t have access to raw whipping cream but thought I could just skim the cream off the raw milk. Would that work?
    Thanks again for sharing this recipe.

    • Kresha Faber says

      Definitely full cream, not partial cream, like half-and-half. Any cream labelled as “whipping cream,” “heavy cream,” or “old-fashioned cream” should be fine. And your idea of skimming the cream off raw milk would work really well, provided you’ve got enough milk to skim that quantity of cream. 🙂

      Enjoy!

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