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How to Eat More Raw Egg Yolks

How to Eat More Raw Egg Yolks | NourishingJoy.com

The nutrition provided by eggs are a notoriously contentious subject. Personally – I love them, both for nutrition and frugality.

Eggs are a nutrient rich, natural, whole food, and despite what the health craze of the last two decades would lead you to believe, the majority of an egg’s nutrition lies in its yolk, not in its white. Of course, the two parts are complimentary, but if you’re going to separate them, the yolk is the golden prize.

And what I find especially fascinating is how much nutrition is packed into an egg yolk. Here’s an especially enlightening quote from WHFoods:

“Eggs have long been recognized as a source of high-quality protein. The World Health Organization (WHO) and other public health authorities actually use eggs as their reference standard for evaluating the protein quality in all other foods… The high quality of egg protein is based on the mixture of amino acids it contains. (Amino acids are the building blocks for making proteins.) Eggs provide a complete range of amino acids, including branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, valine), sulfur-containing amino acids (methionine, cysteine), lysine, tryptophan, and all other essential amino acids. Their protein is sometimes referred to as a ‘complete protein’ for this reason.” (source)

Did you catch that? The protein in eggs is considered to be of such high quality and bio-availabililty that the proteins in all other foods are compared to eggs in order to determine their quality. Fascinating!

I also find it fascinating that eggs are one of the few non-sea-based foods to provide a high amount of iodine and selenium.

Since I started studying Dr. Weston A. Price’s research, I’ve often heard the statement that land-locked native peoples often traded for and prized seafood, such as shrimp and seaweed, for its iodine content.

However, I’ve often wondered how those peoples satisfied their needs for those essential minerals and other nutrients when they couldn’t get seafood. This, perhaps, answers that question – eggs! (Assuming the eggs of wild fowl provide a similar nutrient profile to that of chickens, of course.)

So, eggs are nutritious no matter how you eat them, but then there’s the matter of eating them raw….

Short of the images from the pop-culture film Napolean Dynamite of a crazy farmer breaking an egg into a pitcher of orange juice and guzzling it down or Rocky stumbling to his fridge early in the morning to break eggs directly into his drinking glass, how do you go about getting more raw egg yolks in your diet in realistic ways?

For that, my friend Marillyn best answers that question (with pictures of gorgeous brilliantly orange yolks from her own hens, nonetheless! Something I can only dream about at this point…) and she offers a number of ways to get more raw egg yolks in your diet in delicious ways.

She also gives some really great straight-forward advice on the benefits of raw egg yolks to pregnant and nursing moms. (SO important!)

Click here to read more about the benefits of raw egg yolks and get delicious recipes at Just Making Noise!

 

So, I’ll leave the final word in this article to you…..

What’s YOUR favorite way to eat raw egg yolks?

 

How to Eat More Raw Egg Yolks | NourishingJoy.com

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This post may contain affiliate links, including those from Amazon.com. These links keep this site running, so thank you for your support!

Comments

  1. Shirley Burdick says

    I looooooove homemade Eggnog! Egg yolks, coconut milk, raw honey, cinamon and nutmeg! Voila!!! Easy Peasy!

  2. MCJam says

    Drop one into your breakfast smoothie, and lots of honey sweetened homemade ice cream for dessert of course. Sunny side up eggs with sourdough spelt bread and soft boiled eggs give you the raw, just warmed yolk with the cooked white.

  3. chieko says

    My breakfast when I don’t have”time” for breakfast consists of 2 beaten organic eggs with a dash of organic soy sauce, 1-2 tsp of coconut oil or olive oil, and black pepper. Just drink it down. The oil is to add “staying power.” Otherwise, I’d be hungry again in 30 minutes. I have no aversion to raw eggs since my mother is Japanese and raw eggs were always being added to something she was making. Quail eggs are good, too!

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