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Classic Cherry Clafoutis

Classic Cherry Clafoutis | NourishingJoy.com

Cherry season is nearly over, but until the last fruit drops from the tree, I will be reveling in the summer sweetness only cherries can offer, so today in my monthly contribution over at GNOWFGLINS, I’ve shared the recipe I use for classic cherry clafoutis. Mmmmmmm…..

Of course, there are so many incredible ways to enjoy cherries — eaten fresh, dehydrated, in cookies, homemade Larabars, sourdough cakes, cheesecake, jams, syrups, and scrumptious dessert sauces. That’s just to name a few.

And if you need inspiration, check out the GNOWFGLINS’ Pinterest board or this one celebrating delectable summer fruits — just for those of us who find a special joy in fruits that taste like sunshine and drip down our chins unwittingly.

However, while all these ways of enjoying cherries are lovely, there is one way I particularly love. I’m a sucker for creamy, silky-smooth custards in all their glorious forms and cherries are a perfect vehicle for this foil. I’ve been pairing our favorite summer fruits with both panna cotta (the super simple Italian custard) and clafoutis (classic French flan that is a sultry ménage à trois of pancake, custard, and cake).

To be honest, you can use any summer fruit in this dish, but berries and stonefruit work best and if you want to be really authentic, it’s a clafouti only when cherries are used. Otherwise it’s known as a flaugnarde. (Thank you, Julia Child, once again for schooling me properly.)

Alright, enough chatting. Let’s cook! 🙂

Click here to see the recipe at GNOWFGLINS.

Happy cooking and happy eating!

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This post may contain affiliate links, including those from Amazon.com, which means we earn a small commission off your purchases. And here's the thing: We only mention services and products that we think are truly worth your attention, whether they're free, paid, or otherwise. This site relies on YOUR trust, so if we don't stand behind a product 110%, it's not mentioned. Period.

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